A. Razor

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Razor never went to college, but he did start reading his prose pieces at readings that were held at the Lhasa Club, Variety Arts Center, Onyx Cafe, Al’s Bar, Beyond Baroque and Van Gogh's Ear in the LA area and the Barn at the University of California, Riverside. At a reading in 1984 he met [[Drew Blood]], owner and editor of [[Drew Blood Press]], Ltd. who published many So-Cal street poets from the early 80's on his D.B.P.L. chapbook series and who would publish 11 different titles of A. Razor's work, including ''Spare Blades'', ''Everything is Shiny Grey'', ''Evil'' and ''Other Safe Lubricants'', ''War in the 13th Hour'', ''Creeping Malaise'', ''A Chapbook and Works'', from 1984-1995. Drew Blood began submitting the poet’s work for publishing in zines and underground publications and acted as his editor as A. Razor started traveling the country from east to west coast. He did readings along the way in places like the Cafe Babar, The Chameleon and The Paradise Lounge in San Francisco, Rifle Sport Gallery and Mayslack’s Bar in Minneapolis, MN, Speedboat Gallery, St Paul, MN, Carousel Of Dreams in Dallas, TX, Carnival in Austin, TX, The Citadel in New Orleans, LA, 6 Feet Under, Phoenix, AZ, The Beat Conference in Lawrence, KS, Naropa Institute, Boulder City, CO, Nuyorican Café and ABC No Rio in NYC, Satyricon in Portland, OR and Food for Thought and D.C. Space in Wash., D.C.  
Razor never went to college, but he did start reading his prose pieces at readings that were held at the Lhasa Club, Variety Arts Center, Onyx Cafe, Al’s Bar, Beyond Baroque and Van Gogh's Ear in the LA area and the Barn at the University of California, Riverside. At a reading in 1984 he met [[Drew Blood]], owner and editor of [[Drew Blood Press]], Ltd. who published many So-Cal street poets from the early 80's on his D.B.P.L. chapbook series and who would publish 11 different titles of A. Razor's work, including ''Spare Blades'', ''Everything is Shiny Grey'', ''Evil'' and ''Other Safe Lubricants'', ''War in the 13th Hour'', ''Creeping Malaise'', ''A Chapbook and Works'', from 1984-1995. Drew Blood began submitting the poet’s work for publishing in zines and underground publications and acted as his editor as A. Razor started traveling the country from east to west coast. He did readings along the way in places like the Cafe Babar, The Chameleon and The Paradise Lounge in San Francisco, Rifle Sport Gallery and Mayslack’s Bar in Minneapolis, MN, Speedboat Gallery, St Paul, MN, Carousel Of Dreams in Dallas, TX, Carnival in Austin, TX, The Citadel in New Orleans, LA, 6 Feet Under, Phoenix, AZ, The Beat Conference in Lawrence, KS, Naropa Institute, Boulder City, CO, Nuyorican Café and ABC No Rio in NYC, Satyricon in Portland, OR and Food for Thought and D.C. Space in Wash., D.C.  
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Razor was arrested, convicted and imprisoned several times during his life. He did time in California (Chino, Vacaville, Tehachapi, San Quentin) as well as other states and under Federal jurisdiction in places such as El Reno, OK, Des Moines, IA, St. Cloud, MN, Riker's Island, NY. He was sporadically homeless and was either on the run from the law or in custody from 1983-2007. This type of lifestyle made using a nom de plume/guerre most necessary to keep some type of anonymity as he traveled and shared his art. Few people ever knew his true identity, as he used a series of false ID's and passports and never allowed anyone to call him anything but "Razor". This life on the run and in incarceration led to him developing a close relationship with his writing and the time he spent locked up was utilized well in the study of words and literature. He lived by anti-hierarchical standards and examined many different philosophies and points of view. He was violently opposed to bullying and fascist tendencies that he perceived to be prevalent in the corporate consumer culture that the world seemed addicted to. He worked odd jobs everywhere he went and had learned a lot about film making as a teenager, eeking out an existence by working on back lots in Hollywood as a runner and a P.A. long enough to learn how to be a 1st A. D. He would work as a freelancer in the film industry, off and on, for most of his life. He enjoyed many types of music, played bass guitar in several bands for short stints in his youth, but eventually felt more comfortable recording other musical efforts and acting as a producer/engineer in some places. It is no secret anymore that he fueled most of his adventures and travels through the sales of contraband and vice. He promoted and ran many different private after hours clubs, mostly in L.A., a few in New York, San Francisco, Las Vegas. All them temporary "hustles" that allowed him access to clients and a networking venture to enable more underground commerce. This activity was profitable, but the "hit and run" nature meant nothing was permanent and movement was constantly necessary to avoid legal entanglements. He was also a considerable marijuana cultivator for many years and smuggled marijuana, as well as other drugs on occasion, in order to travel and pay for expenses. This activity kept him out of the city and in remote areas in Northern California, Hawaii and once in Oregon for periods of time that would enable him to taper down his drug use and exposure to the faster, violent and tumultuous world of smuggling, dealing and using drugs that he was susceptible to when in urban settings. The pressures of this living and the extreme conditions it led to are an important part of his need to express himself artistically and to balance his mind after the trauma that this type of living and the culture he was immersed in might cause.
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Razor was arrested, convicted and imprisoned several times during his life. He did time in California (Chino, Vacaville, Tehachapi, San Quentin) as well as other states and under Federal jurisdiction in places such as El Reno, OK, Des Moines, IA, St. Cloud, MN, Riker's Island, NY. He was sporadically homeless and was either on the run from the law or in custody from 1983-2007. This type of lifestyle made using a nom de plume/guerre most necessary to keep some type of anonymity as he traveled and shared his art. Few people ever knew his true identity, as he used a series of false ID's and passports and never allowed anyone to call him anything but "Razor". This life on the run and in incarceration led to him developing a close relationship with his writing and the time he spent locked up was utilized well in the study of words and literature. He lived by anti-hierarchical standards and examined many different philosophies and points of view. He was violently opposed to bullying and fascist tendencies that he perceived to be prevalent in the corporate consumer culture that the world seemed addicted to. He worked odd jobs everywhere he went and had learned a lot about film making as a teenager, eeking out an existence by working on back lots in Hollywood as a runner and a P.A. long enough to learn how to be a 1st A. D. He would work as a freelancer in the film industry, off and on, for most of his life. He enjoyed many types of music, played bass guitar in several bands for short stints in his youth, but eventually felt more comfortable recording other musical efforts and acting as a producer/engineer in some places. It is no secret anymore that he fueled most of his adventures and travels through the sales of contraband and vice. He promoted and ran many different private after hours clubs, mostly in L.A., a few in New York, San Francisco, Las Vegas. All of them temporary "hustles" that allowed him access to clients and a networking venture to enable more underground commerce. This activity was profitable, but the "hit and run" nature meant nothing was permanent and movement was constantly necessary to avoid legal entanglements. He was also a considerable marijuana cultivator for many years and smuggled marijuana, as well as other drugs on occasion, in order to travel and pay for expenses. This activity kept him out of the city and in remote areas in Northern California, Hawaii and once in Oregon for periods of time that would enable him to taper down his drug use and exposure to the faster, violent and tumultuous world of smuggling, dealing and using drugs that he was susceptible to when in urban settings. The pressures of this living and the extreme conditions it led to are an important part of his need to express himself artistically and to balance his mind after the trauma that this type of living and the culture he was immersed in might cause.
He settled in Minneapolis., MN in 1989-90 for a brief time and started publishing and editing the ''[[Your Elbow Lit-Art Zine]]'' with [[Kim Koch]] and [[Erika Schlaeger]].  He has lived and written in many other cities, including New York, NY, Portland, OR, San Francisco, Oakland and Bolinas, CA. He recently became a member of the [[Hollywood Institute of Poetics]] in Los Angeles, CA in 2009. This same year and in 2010 he published work in ''[[Gutter Eloquence]]'', ''[[Lit Up]]'', ''[[Shoots And Vines]]'', ''[[The Bicycle Review]]'',  ''[[Hobo Camp Review]]'', ''[[River Babble]]'', ''[[Girls with Insurance]]'', ''[[Criminal Class Review]]'', ''[[Paraphillia Magazine]]'' and ''[[The Chiron Review]]''. He has also completed the manuscript for his first novel, “1979, A Hollywood Love Story” which has recently been bid on by several publishing concerns.  
He settled in Minneapolis., MN in 1989-90 for a brief time and started publishing and editing the ''[[Your Elbow Lit-Art Zine]]'' with [[Kim Koch]] and [[Erika Schlaeger]].  He has lived and written in many other cities, including New York, NY, Portland, OR, San Francisco, Oakland and Bolinas, CA. He recently became a member of the [[Hollywood Institute of Poetics]] in Los Angeles, CA in 2009. This same year and in 2010 he published work in ''[[Gutter Eloquence]]'', ''[[Lit Up]]'', ''[[Shoots And Vines]]'', ''[[The Bicycle Review]]'',  ''[[Hobo Camp Review]]'', ''[[River Babble]]'', ''[[Girls with Insurance]]'', ''[[Criminal Class Review]]'', ''[[Paraphillia Magazine]]'' and ''[[The Chiron Review]]''. He has also completed the manuscript for his first novel, “1979, A Hollywood Love Story” which has recently been bid on by several publishing concerns.  

Revision as of 20:50, 3 May 2012

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